Consolidating Lessons Learned at Ecology Action

By Laura Navarro

Navaro mug shotI can’t believe how quickly my internship is coming to an end! This is already the sixth week and I only have three more weeks of the internship to look forward to. This is a bittersweet thought, I have made great friends here and have fallen in love with Mendocino County; I could see myself living here after I complete my degree. At the same time, I look forward to getting back to Stockton and starting new projects in the Robb Garden at the University of the Pacific. I hope to implement the 8 biointensive principles in the UOP garden, and I would love to have a few beds of my own as well.

The weather has been very good to us these past few weeks, around 90 degrees at the high, which permitted us to get a lot of work done in the garden. The summer cover crop has been removed, the grains have been harvested, and the winter plants are starting to get flatted! One day we spent so much time harvesting grain that my socks and shoes were covered in the prickly grain hairs. The grains were so mature that they were shattering (the grain was falling out of the grain heads very easily), which made bundling difficult because we wanted to save all the loose grains. We harvested potatoes in a bed and were surprised to find pretty good yields! These potatoes were put in the ground a little too early, and Rachel had been expecting very low yields, so we were pleasantly surprised to find a nice amount of potatoes.

We are coming to an end to our internship so I am starting to make a list of all the things I want to do before I leave the Golden Rule Garden. I want to make some flats to bring home, collect as many seeds as possible, learn how to make pesto and a few Kenyan dishes, and make a list of all the literature people have suggested to me. I want to make sure that I leave with all my questions answered and long-lasting relationships with the amazing people I have met while being here. This has been a great experience so far and I wish I could stay even longer but I am excited to share what I have learned with people back at home.

Tiger Quickness in the Garden at Ecology Action

By Pauline Montemayor

Montemayor mug shotI discovered something about myself since being here. It’s that I could, indeed, sweat like an NBA player. Right when I was getting into the swing of things, like waking up much earlier than I would on summer vacation, we were hit with a heat wave. We don’t have the luxury of air conditioning anywhere on the farm. Therefore, our workdays were to begin much earlier in order to beat the heat, but our duties remained the same. That same weekend, though, I was in for a treat. I rode a horse bareback with very little guidance from the horse’s owner, Ellen. The experience definitely blew any trail riding experiences out of the water, especially since I had the opportunity to control the horse as I pleased.

But besides that, my adjustment to life on the farm has been easy. As far as the work goes, I have been able to grasp new techniques quickly and become a U-bar master. According to the garden manager and mentor, Rachel, the speed of completing tasks by past interns had been “notoriously slow.” However, Laura and I had surprised her. In one morning, specifically within two hours, we were able to clear, shape, and amend a little more than 100 square feet (not an easy feat because of the amount of manual labor involved.) Soon, it became the norm for Laura and I to ask what needed to be done next instead of Rachel nudging us along. As for classes, it’s been a challenge for me to find the motivation to sit and pay attention. This is especially true when these classes take place outside in the blistering heat.

Another intern has come along to join us. He’s a sixteen-year-old, who once lived in the Golden Rule community five years ago. Although he’s familiar with the area, he’s still new to some of the practices in the garden. So to make it a bit easier on Rachel (who already works her tail off), Laura and I have been teaching him the ropes. Outside of work, though, it’s a bit of a comedy seeing this teenager interact with my other housemates. For me, especially, it’s a bit surreal because of the fact that I’m ten years older than him and do not understand some of his pop culture references. I’m sure he feels the same way, considering he had to ask what a VHS tape was.

All in all, my experience thus far has gone unchanged. Everything is still very exciting and I anticipate more learning opportunities in and out of the garden.

July Heat in the Ecology Action Garden

By Laura Navarro

Navaro mug shotThe past two weeks have flown by! The week of July 18th was extremely hot with temperatures rising to 111 degrees, and apparently we have already beat last year’s record high. Although I worked in the garden at the University of the Pacific, I am not used to working in such hot weather. I’d find myself taking a lot of breaks and was easily irritable during this week of hot weather. But I got through it and was rewarded with cooler weather the following week! I keep asking locals what they expect the rest of the summer’s weather will be to like and they all talk about heat waves to be expected in July.  I am hoping the weather stays below 100 degrees so that I can work comfortably. I want to be able to give my full attention to the plants and learn as much as I can, but this won’t be easy if I’m frying in the sun.

Despite it being hot, we have been getting a lot of work done in the garden. The garden has been going through some amazing transformations and already looks very different from when we started. The grains are being harvested and baby plants are getting transplanted into the beds. I wish I was doing the six month internship so that I could be here when the baby plants are being harvested. I’d like to be able to witness the full life cycle of the plants that I started from seed. Maybe I will come back up and visit when it is time to harvest the plants that I started.

Speaking of seeds, I have found a new passion in seed saving. I have been told that since 1903, 93% of the known fruit and vegetable varieties have gone extinct! This means that there is only about 9% of the corn varieties left in the world, 8% of the tomato varieties left, 7% of carrot varieties left…and much more has been lost! We often talk about animal extinctions and our efforts to preserve the endangered animals species, but there’s not much talk about plant extinction. These plant extinctions are just as important as the animals; in fact, I would argue that they are even more important because plants feed the world. With the changing climate and our demand for food increasing, preserving plant varieties is becoming more important. This has sparked a new interest in seed saving for me. I’d like to save seed from every crop I grow from now on, especially heirloom and rare varieties that are at risk of becoming extinct. There is a great documentary that I recommend watching called Seed: The Untold Story. This documentary sheds light on the challenges farmers have been facing and the importance of saving seed.

With every passing day I think of this internship less as a one-time experience, and more as the first step to a path of agriculture and sustainability. I am grateful to have this opportunity and I plan to continue on my path after the internship is over!