Biointensive Instensity

by Patty A. Gray, Garden Program Director

PattyGrayOur student Garden Planning & Planting Lead, Laura Navarro, has returned to Pacific’s campus and to the Robb Garden like a dirt-churning whirlwind. If you stop by the Robb Garden these days, you’ll see mounds of freshly-turned soil where compacted earth had been, as Laura transforms what used to be a barren patch of the garden into soft, tidy beds. She has tenderly tucked seedlings of broccoli, kale and lettuce Into these fresh garden beds, as carrot seedlings and single-leafed grain seedlings spring up alongside.

Laura spent her summer at two Ecology Action gardens in Northern California – the Golden Rule Garden in Willits, and the Victory Gardens for Peace in Mendocino – learning biointensive gardening techniques. Now in her Junior year at Pacific, she is registered for internship credits in Environmental Science, advised by Dr. Lydia Fox, and she is applying what she learned in the Robb Garden.

2017-09-18 17.47.23There’s no doubt about it: biointensive gardening is intensive – labor intensive. New beds are carved into soil by hand through double-digging – as in doubly deep. Insect pests are picked off by hand or sprayed with a biodegradable soap solution and then gently washed off. Weeds – many of which are desirable vegetables and flowers that simply managed to seed themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time – are plucked out by hand.

For Laura, it is a labor of love, never mind how cliche that may sound. She loves the work, and she loves the plants – she talks about them as if they were her children. She built her own wooden flats for starting her seeds, which she keeps in a makeshift nursery on a table in the Robb Garden, sheltered from the sun’s full intensity behind a screen of tall tomato plants. Watching her hunched over her seedlings in a garden bed, I have seen her straighten up, sigh, and declare beatifically, “I’m so happy,” with an unmistakable expression of bliss on her face.

Laura blisses out

But this is anything but mere hippy-dippy dabbling for Laura. She has brought scientific precision to the planting practices of the Robb Garden. The seeding of each vegetable variety is timed by counting back from the average first frost date in our area, and she created a spreadsheet to track the timing of pricking out the seedlings and later transplanting them to garden beds. If you look closely at the beds she has planted, you will see small labels for each vegetable variety with a set of codes that she developed. If you understand her coding system, you can instantly know the history of each plant starting from its seedhood.

Lauraa's flats  Laura's labels

It is an absolute joy to hand over responsibility to a Pacific student and watch her grab onto it and unfurl it like it was a set of wings carrying her aloft and not a weight dragging her down. The Robb Garden is designed to be a space of ‘experiential learning’ for students; that’s become quite a buzz word in higher education these days, but Laura makes me believe in it. We can stand back and watch her learning and growing through direct experience of nature in the garden.

Come see.

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